REVIEWS

From mainstream blockbuster tentpoles, to award-winning independent films, we all got you covered to what's to see and what's not to see. The geek's review is a useful guide for your cinematic pleasure.

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A film manual to some of the films to look out for this year... and beyond!

TOP 5

A popular segment in this site wherein we dish out our TOP 5 films/ moments/ awesomeness of something or someone.

Rio 2 (Film Review)

'Rio 2' is one of the great examples of how an animated sequel should be, which is rarely made. Retaining the vibrant look of the visuals and musical numbers, while adding effective humor and new characters in between. Okay, I was a bit skeptical of how this movie'll turn out. Sequels from animated movies these days often come pretty bad and lame, but Blue Sky Studios sure learned their lessons with their recent Ice Age movies.The film slightly got to the lame-sequel direction with its final half, but all-in: this is pack of joy and delight. Kids will definitely enjoy this, big time.

Read The Screenplay For 'Gone Girl'

One thing that made David Fincher's 'Gone Girl' was the excellent script by Gillian Flynn, whom is also the author of the book it's based on -- providing a very faithful film adaptation. It manages to tight every single detail without actually being dragging on it's lengthy 2 1/2 hour running time. The back-and-forth of Amy and Nick Dunne felt natural and realistic, and the effective over-use of narration made the 'cool girl' a lot more cooler. 

Since the award considerations is starting to heat up right in the corner, with 20th Century Fox pushing Andy Serkis on the circle of the Best Actor category list in the competition, they release the official screenplay of 'Gone Girl' for your enjoyment. Great stuff!

Click here to see the pdf file courtesy of Fox!
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'Ghostbusters' Go Up Against 'Mythbusters' In A Rap Battle!! (VIDEO)

Nice Peter and Epic Lloyd's smash video series 'Epic Rap Battles of History' is taking on one of their most requested fights for their next video: 'Ghostbusters' vs 'Mythbusters'. The popular YouTube serial pits historical (or popular culture) figures in a rap battle of wit and brains. The video, down below, is the channel's 4th season debut battle, which coincidentally just in time with the 30th anniversary of the release of 'Ghostbusters' in cinemas!






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Interstellar (Film Review)

'Interstellar' -- the latest movie behind the brains of Jonathan and Christopher Nolan that delves deeper with the concept of time and black hole where no film has gone before. I have seen it twice, and though there are flaws that are pretty noticeable and how divisive moviegoers will be on it's ending, there's no denying it's still a great experience at the cinema. Toppled with intense performances by it's all-star cast, gorgeous looking visuals, and the unbelievable space travel sequences that are mind-blowing.

Unlike what other people would compare this film to, Alfonso Cuaron's Gravity, the Earth is presented as the wasteland. Corn was the last few remaining source of food to supply the mankind, and dirt has slowly wiping out everything we worked for. The space, and the far reaches of galaxy might be the only hope for our human race to survive; with potential habitable worlds that could conserve us.
Enter Matthew McConaughey's Cooper, a former engineer that is tasked to go up against Anne Hathaway, David Gyasi and Wes Bentley on an intergalactic voyage to the vast place of space and time, and also the family he is leaving behind.

This film being the most hyped film of the rest of 2014, the excitement that builds up with the movie is crazy, not only it is Christopher Nolan's comeback post-Batman trilogy, 'Interstellar' might have been the last few film we might see that's shot on traditional film. The outburst of film-buffs in my screening were present, with the giggles of the crowd every time a wideshot of space is projected on-screen. It's crazy.
It was a beautiful film. It truly is. And how the new technology and CGI was utilized in the film felt natural, without the second thoughts of actually looking like something that's made out a computer. The realism and gorgeousness of the artworks done by the effects team were spot-on. I honestly thought I was actually looking at what might be a real black hole. 

Add that to the IMAX 70mm format (You seriously need to see this film at this), which extends the awe-ness of the experience to a more groundbreaking scale. It's essentially like going to see 2001: A Space Odyssey as a kid.

The performance were great. Led by a fresh Oscar winner Matthew McConaughey, the McConaissance continues as he brings the movie to a high level of drama. The father-and-daughter relationship between him and Mackenzie Foy was so affecting, that I really wish the movie could've been better if it focuses more on that than making pitstops at space.
Recurring Nolan alumnus, Anne Hathaway and the great Michael Caine were no exception. The two also played father-and-daughter that needed more characterization. Same goes to Casey Affleck and Wes Bentley whom the audiences didn't bother that much whenever something "big" happens to them. 

The plot holes will be there. Nolan himself expressed his fair share of comments that the ending will indeed split the audiences into two. Pretty obvious since the ending really sets to a conclusion where it doesn't need to be. There is a scene halfway through the final act of the film (You'd already guess this one if you already saw the movie) where it could've been a lot perfect if it concludes there as it is. But it wants to delve more, and continued moving on for the next 10 or so minutes. That's just me.
Anyways, three hours didn't feel like a stretch at all since it really makes you continue to wonder scene-after-scene. It mightn't be as mind-boggling as Nolan's headhitters Inception or Memento, 'Interstellar' is still a heck of a ride through space and time. It has been a while wherein a mainstream film could cause more discussions and blown-up brains than this movie. A trippy experience at the cinema, indeed.

The geek rates it 8/10.
'Interstellar' is now showing in cinemas nationwide, and available in various formats (IMAX 70mm, IMAX Digital, 4DX, 35mm, Digital) from Warner Bros. Pictures Philippines!!

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Better Late Than Never! Boyhood is Officially Coming in Philippine Cinemas!!

Richard Linklater's 12 years in the making drama 'Boyhood' is officially getting the big thumbs up release on selected cinemas soon in the Philippines! Since a specified date has not been confirmed by the studio (Columbia Pictures Philippines), it's but a relief since it's definitely a long wait after it's premiere on July 11 on US theaters. I already saw the film, and it was a marvelous experience. The amount of work has been done here really paid off, chronicling a young man's life upto adulthood. It's more than a film, I have to say.
Filmed over 12 years with the same cast, this film is a groundbreaking story of growing up as seen through the eyes of a child named Mason, who literally grows up on screen before our eyes. This drama charts the rocky terrain of childhood like no other film has before. Snapshots of adolescence from road trips and family dinners to birthdays and graduations and all the moments in between become transcendent, set to a soundtrack spanning the years from Coldplay's Yellow to Arcade Fire's Deep Blue. The film is both a nostalgic time capsule of the recent past and an ode to growing up and parenting. It's impossible not to watch Mason and his family without thinking about our own journey.



Get to know Mason... soon on Philippine cinemas!
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Which 'Interstellar' Format Should You See? Here's a guide.

'Interstellar' is already out today in cinemas nationwide. To commemorate the release, Director Christopher Nolan made the special treat for cinema aficionados to see the movie in "film" format two days ahead on it's original date. This weekend, the sci-fi epic will be available in multiple formats: IMAX 70mm, IMAX Digital, and 35mm to name a few.

The good folks at Slate.com uploaded a handy video breaking down the difference between each, to help you decide which interests you (Protip: See it in IMAX 70mm. It's the definitive way to see this movie.
Here's also a guide chart released by Warner Bros. Pictures.

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Big Hero 6 (Film Review)

'Big Hero 6' is the first animated feature from Disney on what looks like one of the many Marvel comic books the studio is adapting on-screen. But unlike the recent Marvel feature movies released, this one is dependent on it's own. No Iron Man, Captain America or Thor, it's pretty clear that Disney want things to be fresh, since this movie have the elements of your typical superhero blockbuster, while having the classic warmth and heart of a Disney film.

At it's core, the film is about the special bond between a kid and a robot. Prodigy Hiro Hamada, on the state of despair after his brother Tadashi died on an accident, found a friend with his robot Baymax -- a inflatable, soft, personal care assistant that is too reminiscent of the Marshmallow man from 'Ghostbusters II'.
When a devastating event befalls the city of San Fransokyo and catapults Hiro into the midst of danger, he turns to Baymax and his close friends: adrenaline junkie GoGo Tomago, neatnik Wasabi, chemistry whiz Honey Lemon and fanboy Fred. Determined to uncover the mystery, Hiro transforms his friends into a band of high-tech heroes called “Big Hero 6.”

Though it didn't pull the strings better than Disney's previous animated films like Frozen and Wreck-It Ralph, this movie is a lot of fun. And I mean, antics after antics that children (and adults as well) will have a great time with. The star of the movie, Baymax will be remembered in a long time after the release of this movie, has the most laughs than any character. His adorable presence is for sure one of the many reasons you should see this movie.
If there is any gripes I had for this movie, is that it's too short. Things went really fast that you want to see what might happen to Hiro and his merry troop of nerds. There were no slow moments, right from the first scene with Hiro fighting with his self-made machine-killer to the last few touching moments.

The visuals were beautiful and vibrant as well. The stand-out was the sleek and stylish design of the city San Fransokyo, which mashes the east and west coast, may as well be a character to the film. 

'Big Hero 6' is a lot of fun. I had an enormous fun with it. See it with how many kids you can bring with. We might see these guys again soon enough. 

In Marvel tradition, stay until the credits roll ended. Not really big, so don't expect Nick Fury pop-up and ask Baymax to join the Avengers. 

The geek rates it a 8/10. 

'Big Hero 6' is rated G and locally distributed by Walt Disney Pictures!
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Matthew McConaughey Leads Magnificent Voyage in 'Interstellar'

Newly-minted Oscar-winner Matthew McConaughey stars in Warner Bros. Pictures' “Interstellar” as Cooper, a former test pilot and engineer in the tradition of the adrenaline-fueled flyboys who continually challenge their own limitations to carve our path into the stars.

For director Christopher Nolan, only Matthew McCounaughey could effortlessly convey that archetypal figure. “He embodies everything we were looking for in casting Cooper—the spirit of adventure, a cowboy-like swagger, and the warmth of somebody who’s involved with his family first and foremost,” the director states. “He has all of those intangible qualities present in the character, paired with his incredible professionalism and humor. It was a wonderful experience to work with him on this film.”

McConaughey describes Cooper as “a dreamer and a man out of time. He’s not supposed to be a farmer. He’s supposed to be out there—that’s where he lives.” But in “Interstellar,” the world needs farmers, not pilots. After a blight has decimated the food supply, civilization has turned back to the earth and clings to the only viable crop left—corn. “Life has become about growing food and having clean water,” the actor continues. “We don’t need any explorers; we don’t need any astronauts; we don’t need any bright ideas. But Cooper is trying his best to live in this world, and to hold things together for his children.”

Cooper’s teenage son Tom, played by Timothée Chalamet, loves the farm and helps his dad to keep it running. Chalamet recalls that on the day before shooting began, McConaughey helped set the stage for their onscreen relationship. “Matthew asked me, ‘What do you know about combine greasing and the methods in which pesticides are sprayed over corn fields?’” Chalamet recalls. “That night, I looked everything up to make sure I could answer all those questions the next day, but that experience with Matthew told me so much about Tom’s relationship with his dad. Cooper wants to know he can rely on him to handle things, and Tom wants to prove to him that he can.”
Cooper’s daughter, Murph, played by Mackenzie Foy, takes after her father in ways Tom never could. “Murph is obsessed with rockets and space, even though no one talks about those things anymore,” Foy says. “She might have felt out of place in this world, but her dad encourages her to stay curious and that gives her the confidence to be brave.”

Producer Emma Thomas reveals, “Cooper loves both of his children deeply, but shares a special bond with Murph over their shared passion for science and discovery. But, as with many parents and children, what binds them together can also pull them apart.”

Sealed off in an underground bunker, a small group of scientists and engineers is aiming higher than the dirt that no longer seems willing to sustain the human race and are gambling their lives on the prospect that somewhere in the universe lies a planet that might. The project was sparked by the mysterious appearance of a disturbance near Saturn—a wormhole that bores through a higher dimension of space and time to a galaxy that would take lifetimes to reach without it. And to endure such a journey, the group has salvaged the best available technology from the ruins of the space program to build the mission’s three ships: the Ranger shuttle, the Lander heavy-lift vehicle, and the Endurance mothership waiting in low Earth orbit.

The one thing the mission lacks is an experienced pilot. McConaughey offers, “Suddenly, the dream that Cooper’s been chasing all his life is knocking on his door. And it’s not just the chance to be a pilot again but to lead the most important mission of all time. The consequence of that opportunity, though, is having to leave his two kids behind, and what no one can tell him is how long he will be gone.”
Opening across the Philippines on Nov. 6, “Interstellar” is distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. “Interstellar” is available in four formats: IMAX 70mm Film (at IMAX SM Mall of Asia), 35mm Film (at Glorietta 4, Sta. Lucia East and Trinoma), IMAX Digital (at SM Aura Premiere, SM Cebu, SM Clark, SM Lanang, SM Megamall, SM North EDSA and SM Southmall) and Digital 2D (most theatres nationwide).

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Director Christopher Nolan Pushes The Limits With 'Interstellar'

Humankind has always shaped its destiny by pushing its limits—from the first ships setting sail for the edge of the horizon to the first human steps on the surface of the moon—yet the ultimate frontier remains tantalizingly out of reach. From director/writer/producer Christopher Nolan, “Interstellar” hinges on the provocative question of humanity’s place in the stars.

“To me, space exploration represents the absolute extreme of what the human experience is,” Nolan says. “It’s all about trying, in some way, to define what our existence means in terms of the universe. For a filmmaker, the extraordinary nature of a few select individuals pushing the boundaries of where the human species has ever been or can possibly go opens up an infinite set of possibilities. I was excited by the prospect of making a film that would take the audience into that experience through the eyes of those first explorers moving outwards into the galaxy—indeed to a whole other galaxy. That’s as big a journey as you can imagine trying to tell.”

Set in a near-future in which an agricultural crisis has brought the world to its knees, “Interstellar” chronicles a daring mission to pierce the barriers of time and space in a desperate human gamble against extinction. “I’ve always been interested in what the next step in our evolution might be. If the Earth is a nest, how would we respond when the time comes to leave it?”

Against the limitless canvas of this high-stakes adventure into the stars, Nolan reveals that what ultimately drives the film is the intimate human story at its core. “I feel that the magnitude and grandeur of space is most interesting as a backdrop for exploring relationships, which are so strong and meaningful for us, and how that relates to our place in the universe.”
Matthew McConaughey was taken by the emotional threads that ground the spectacle in human dimensions. “What is amazing to me is that while the excitement of the story lies in its scope—the thrill of adventure and discovery of the unknown—one of my favorite things about Chris Nolan is the heartbeat of humanity he gives to his films,” the actor states. “No one handles the sheer mass and scale of a world like he does because it always comes off as something personal and intimate.”

Anne Hathaway ties this quality in Nolan’s films to his focus on the human stakes in even the most heroic endeavor. “From the beginning of time, the reach to expand our world or move our civilization forward has always involved great sacrifice by a handful of individuals, who put the greater good over any risk to themselves. This film really celebrates those who are brave enough to do that.”

Jessica Chastain adds that the film also celebrates the connections that sustain us. “This story is full of longing and heartbreak, but at its core is the beautiful idea that even if love is not something you can hold in your hands, it remains with you across vast distances in time and space.”

Co-screenwriter Jonathan Nolan admits that the nearly inconceivably dimensions of the universe led them down some fascinating narrative pathways. “The reality of the universe is that while it’s magnificent to look at and inspires a great sense of wonder, it’s cold, airless and vast—so vast that we have no idea how big it really is,” he says. “So, the effort was to try to take a big idea and ground it as much as possible to give you a real sense for what interstellar space travel would feel like, not only as a tactile experience, but in terms of the emotional toll such a treacherous and isolating journey would have on human beings.”
Opening across the Philippines on Nov. 6, 2014 in theaters and IMAX®, “Interstellar” is distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.

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